Tuesday, 19 April 2011

Norfolk weekend - Wells Next the Sea

After a good couple of hours walking it was time for a much needed beer !
So where better than a 100 year old Dutch clipper, built in Rotterdam in 1899. The Albatros now resides in Wells-next-the-sea serving traditional Dutch food and decent Beer.
The beautiful ship was built for Johannes Muller from Middelhanis, Holland where she remained until being sold to Denmark in 1918.
It is belived her owner at this time, and through to the Second World War was a Captain Rasmussen, who used The Albatros as a cargo ship, exporting grain from Denmark to Sweden and even assisted Jewish refugees with their escape from Nazi Germany and delivered weapons to the Danish Resistance.
It has also been used by Greenpeace as an environmental study centre for schoolchildren, and she has now returned to Wells-next-the-sea where she resides on an almost permanent basis.
Whatever it was a great way to round off our first night in Norfolk.



Boats in Wells harbour, the fishing fleet is now reduced to 14 boats which work
the waters up to 35 miles out from Wells. The profits today are mainly
in crab and lobster.


Saltmarsh on the coastal footpath.

'Tour guide' Elizabeth

Me with 'Roxy' just 2 days old.


To celebrate six years of marriage (who said it wouldn't last) we decided to travel East to the nort Norfolk coast for a few days. Had taken a bit of a gamble by booking in to a working farm that breeds cattle and deers. It was great and the family were very friendly, the only problem for me was the low beams in the attic room where we stayed. After bumping my head several times I soon learnt my lesson.
After a lovely guided tour of the farm by Elizabeth aged 10 we set off to explore Wells next the sea.
A beautiful and historic seaside resort, Wells is a great location for an English countryside break. The area is great for sightseeing, water sports, bird watching and country walks in an area designated as outstanding natural beauty.
We opted for a long coastal walk to see the North Norfolk marshland coast at its best, where the living view changes constantly with the tides.
The main harbour channel, a wide stretch of water at high tide, becomes a narrow, meandering, shallow creek at low water.
Commercial trade through the port of Wells is a thing of the past.

2 comments:

  1. There is no way that lamb is 2 years old! Did you mean weeks? months?

    ReplyDelete
  2. Yes I did-good spot and thanks for paying attention !

    ReplyDelete